$18M plugged into Region 6 healthcare delivery

first_imgAs part of Vision 2020The Region Six (East Berbice/Corentyne) health department received a boost on Tuesday when Guyana Medical Relief Inc donated in excess of $18 million in medical supplies to the Regional Health Services.The presentation was made to Director of Public Health Services, Jevaughn Stephens by President of St Francis Community Developers, Alex Foster on behalf of Guyana Medical Relief Inc.Following the presentation the supplies were distributed to the region’s 28 health centres, posts, and hospitals.Stephens noted that it is essential to have partnerships with stakeholders to improve healthcare delivery in the region.The Ministry of Public Health in its efforts to achieve the Package of Essential Healthcare Services (PEHS) has stressed the need forThe supplies donated by the Guyana Medical Relief Incsupport from all stakeholders.Stephens noted that the presentation was a demonstration of the good relationship with Guyana Medical Relief Inc and Food for the Poor.The donation included both supplies and over-the-counter drugs: “These supplies would be distributed equally across the region so that at all health centres and hospitals persons will have access to the same healthcare.”He said it is a boost to achieve health vision 2020: “We want to see in the country that there is equal access to health delivery across the region… We want our plans to be known and for there to be evidence of proper and equitable distribution across the region, and there is no shortage of essential drugs across the region.”The PEHS is a programme of the Public Health Ministry as a blueprint as to where healthcare delivery should be in 2020: “What do you want from your health centres; what do you have to do to get there?”Stephens is optimistic that the region’s health department is on track to achieve health vision 2020. “I am a bit bold and I want to say that Region Six may be able to achieve that by mid-2018. I would like my region to be the pilot region as it comes to the rolling out of PEHS.”The $18 million presentation is seen as a step in that direction.last_img read more

Benson Hospital Burns

first_imgThe top floor of Benson Hospital in flames yesterday. The Out-land Community was a scene of grief and disbelief, following a fire incident that gutted the roof of the Benson Hospital where patients were being administered oxygen, surgery and other medical treatment, along with others who had gone to visit friends and relatives or to seek medical attention.When family members and relatives heard that the hospital was on fire, they came crying and running, with some even attempting to rescue family members but were prevented by onlookers in order to avoid injury to their persons.Youths of the community converged on the scene in order to save the hospital from being destroyed because, according to them, it is one of the biggest health facilities in the community that is accessible to residents.They used water from available water wells and other water sources in an attempt to douse the fire until the arrival of the Liberia National Fire Service (LNFS).When the LNFS arrived, youths who had gone to help extinguish the blaze started throwing stones, water and empty buckets at them in frustration because, according to them, that the fire service wasted time in responding to such an emergency involving the lives of so many people.“We had already cut the fire off when the LNFS came to take the glory, which we will not allow to happen. This is a national hospital that can attend to many people in the nation, so if there is a fire outbreak and we called them [LNFS] they have to respond quickly to save lives and medical equipment,” the youth shouted as they threw stones from the top of the building at the firefighters.Pinky Wolo, who had gone for a health certificate, said while awaiting service, a nurse  informed her and others to leave because there was a fire outbreak at the hospital.Ms. Wolo said before leaving the grounds of the hospital, she saw nurses bringing out patients and other medical items out of the hospital to nearby homes in order to save them from being destroyed by the fire.“The nurses were confused so they started throwing beds, chairs and other materials through the windows of the hospital. I later saw nurses bringing 6 children and two older men, who were being administered oxygen treatment, to nearby homes for rescue,” she said.Alex K. Dickson, Director of LNFS, said they have not discovered the source of the fire, but he expressed regret about the incident.He said it is unfortunate that angry youths stoned the vehicle of the LNFS, which resulted into two firefighters being injured, leaving the LNFS car damaged.Dickson said the youth’s action was out of emotion, because they had no understanding about what the LNFS had to go through before arriving at the scene.Dickson said LNFS did not receive an emergency call on its hotline but several calls from individuals, which they needed to confirm before getting prepared in order to arrive at the fire incident on Du-port Road.“People must start to make use of the emergency number, which is 114; besides, when we are on our way to fight a fire, commercial drivers make it difficult for us to reach the place on time. Usually, they refuse to leave the way for us,” he said.He said Liberians must be educated about such difficulties the fire service goes through when leaving their office to get to various locations.Benson Hospital authorities refused to comment on the incident because, according to them, they have not discovered the cause of the fire. The hospital called an ambulance from the John F. Kennedy Medical Center (JFK) to refer its patients that had been admitted.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

A.V. residents get up-close look at KC-135

first_imgFlying a KC-135 today to support combat missions is like having a World War II B-17 bomber fighting in that first Iraq war, the general told Bret Banks, Alis Clausen, Rex Moen and Les Uhazy. “That really drove it home for me,” Banks said. “We really can’t afford to be sending in our fighting forces with this aging equipment.” The Antelope Valley business and education representatives made the trip to Tinker as part of an Air Force Materiel Command program aimed at informing community leaders about the Air Force’s role in national defense. Two to four representatives, depending on a base’s size, are selected to represent the community surrounding one of the command’s 10 major bases, said Judy Bates, a spokeswoman for Materiel Command. Twice a year, the community leaders travel – at their own expense – to one of the command’s bases to learn about the work it does and the local communities’ efforts to offer support. The community leaders are encouraged to share their experiences with civic and community organizations. “That’s what we want them to do – talk to the community,” Bates said. Trips by the community leaders have included visits to the Schriever Air Force Base and the Air Force Academy, both in Colorado; Arnold Air Force Base in Tennessee; Brooks City Base near San Antonio, Texas; and Tinker. “The purpose of the program is to see what the other bases do and how they interact with the other bases,” said Clausen, who has been with the program since it was created in 2001. “We get to interact with the senior leadership and with the community leaders of the bases.” Clausen, a representative of Edison International and a member of the Antelope Valley Board of Trade, said the program has enhanced her appreciation of the men and women in uniform. “Whether they are new airmen just out of their teens or senior leadership, all are very dedicated to their work and very proficient in their work,” Clausen said. “We are looking at very dedicated and exemplary people.” Uhazy, Antelope Valley College’s dean of math and science, has been involved with the program for about two years. “We talk about education. Education comes up everywhere we go,” Uhazy said. “They are so well aware of education issues, the need for engineers, and the issues community colleges and state colleges can work together on.” At Tinker, for example, Uhazy was impressed with how Rose State College, a community college, works closely with the Air Force to help educate its work force. The college teaches courses at lunch hours and after work on the base. The visits also offer Antelope Valley leaders a chance to talk about their efforts to enhance engineering education in the region, including a multi-partnered effort to offer a complete four-year education in mechanical and electrical engineering degrees through Fresno State University. “That’s the whole point of this – to allow for a two-way exchange of information,” said Banks, operations manager for the Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District. The Tinker visit earlier this month included a visit to the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center. The center repairs and maintains a variety of aircraft, including the B-1, B-2 and B-52 bombers, the Navy’s E-6 aircraft and the KC-135 tankers. “It’s amazing that the Air Force has modified and maintained (the KC-135) for nearly 50 years,” Moen said. “How many of us have been driving the same vehicle for 50 years? Furthermore, what would it take to keep that vehicle running if it was driven every day?” The group also learned about the Air Force’s planned KC-X, an aircraft the service hopes to bring online in 2013 to replace the KC-135. james.skeen@dailynews (661) 267-5743160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE – Inside a nearly mile-long building in Oklahoma, four Antelope Valley residents got an up-close look at efforts to keep an aging air tanker fleet flying. Visiting Tinker Air Force Base earlier this month, the quartet saw airmen performing major overhauls on KC-135 Stratotankers – airplanes that are averaging about 45 years of service. The Stratotanker, whose primary mission is mid-air refueling, is a key part of the U.S. military goal of global reach for global power. One Air Force official, illustrating concerns over the aging aircraft, noted the 45-year span since the Stratotankers went into service is the same as the time gap between the end of World War II and the first Iraq war. last_img read more

Teens still like phone calls, face-to-face meetings, study says

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson“Telephone communications and face to face, it’s simply richer than what you get on the Internet,” said Amanda Lenhart, a senior research specialist at Pew. “You get nuances, tone of voice, body language. It’s easier to understand a joke face to face or on the phone than in text-based communications. It’s simply more compelling to folks.” Nonetheless, teens who use social-networking sites – 55 percent of online teens – consider the hangouts important in their social lives. Ninety-one percent of the social-networking teens use the sites to stay in touch with friends they see frequently; 82 percent use them to keep contact with those they rarely see in person. Three-quarters use them to make plans, and half say they make new friends there. “For teens who do use them, they aren’t necessary the primary way (of communicating) but they are one of many ways,” Lenhart said. More than half of social-networking teens have shared photos, videos or other artistic work online, compared with less than a quarter of those who do not use the sites. Among other findings: Teenage girls are more likely than boys to keep a blog, while boys are more apt to share video online. Only one-fifth of teens who post photos online say they never restrict access, compared with nearly half of teens who share video. The telephone-based study of 935 Americans ages 12-17 was conducted Oct. 23 to Nov. 19, 2006, and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! NEW YORK – Teenagers still value phone calls and face-to-face meetings with friends even as they frequent online hangouts like Facebook and MySpace, a new study finds. Nearly 40 percent of teens say they talk to friends on a traditional wired phone every day, and 35 percent say they do so on cell phones, the Pew Internet and American Life Project said last week, analyzing its phone surveys from late 2006. Thirty-one percent of teens say they spend time in person with friends every day. Fewer teens say they communicate daily using instant messaging, text messages or internal messaging systems at Facebook, News Corp.’s MySpace or another social-networking site. Confirming anecdotal evidence, e-mail has lost favor among teens. It ranked at the bottom – used daily by only 14 percent of teens to keep in touch with friends. last_img read more

Job Vacancies: Nursing Home seeks Healthcare Assistants

first_imgJOB VACANCY: One of Donegal’s most reputable Nursing Homes are on the lookout to recruit Healthcare Assistants to join their professional, dynamic and hardworking team.Áras Uí Dhomhnaill Nursing Home, is a 48 bed private state of the art nursing home located in Milford, Co. Donegal.Management are currently recruiting for Healthcare Assistants to join their team for full-time and part-time roles. Requirements: FETAC level 5 or equivalentInterested candidates should apply with CV to Anne McGilloway, Director of Nursing: info@sheephavenhealthcare.comOr alternatively via post to:Anne Mc GillowayDirector of NursingSheephaven HealthcareÁras Uí Dhomhnaill Nursing HomeMilfordCo. DonegalF92 HX32E : info@sheephavenhealthcare.comW : sheephavenhealthcare.comT : 074-9163288F : 074-9163280 Job Vacancies: Nursing Home seeks Healthcare Assistants was last modified: October 18th, 2018 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Áras Uí Dhomhnaill Nursing Homelast_img read more

GAA NEWS: NAOMH MHUIRE CLUB NOTES

first_imgNaomh MhuireThe Seniors have no game this weekend. The Inetrmediate Reserve Championship semi final is scheduled for this Saturday against Termon in Termon with a 5pm throw in. The Reserves had an excellent win last weekend over Urris and all support appreciated.Our youngest squad, the u8s, made the trip to Gaoth Dobhair on Sat for a blitz with 41 players taking part. Coaches and mentors also took them for a wee treat after the blitz in Sgt’Peppers. A great day out was had by all. One small concern was the lack of parental help, every parent is expected to pull their weight and help out in looking after the welfare of children especially on the day of a blitz. Coaches need all the assistance they can get to look after the safety and welfare of our young players, Remember we are in this together for the good of our club. Co-operation is the key! Peil na mBan: The u16 Girls are through to the county u16 championship final after beating Milford in a very entertaining semi-final on tues evening in the Banks. The Minor team made their debut in the minor championship with with two wins out of two played this puts them into the semi-final stages of the competition. Adh mór ar na Cailini. Dates to be confirmed.Lotto details for week 26th September. Jackpot 3020 euro. No jackpot winner and three match 3 winners: Antoin O’Dochartaigh – Rann na feirste, Ethan Greene – 61b Rann na feirste agus Christina McBride – Anagaire. Numbers were 4-14-17-22.Sept 100 club draw winners: €400: Paul McDevitt – Anagaire. €200: Peggy Sweeney Stack – New York. €100 each: Seamus Ferry – Loch an Iuir, Mairtin Ó Mainnion – Bún na mBean. €50each: Joe Sharkey – Anagaire, Charlie Yank Boyle, Joe Bán Gallagher – Min ná Leice, Paul Gallagher – Rann na feirste, Paul McBride – Loch ná nDeorain agus John McGinley – Coilcheim.Check out details on www.naomhmhuire.ie.  GAA NEWS: NAOMH MHUIRE CLUB NOTES was last modified: October 2nd, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Naomh Mhuire Club noteslast_img read more

Agenda 10/17

first_img The Stargazer Oriental Restaurant & Bar will host a business networking mixer at 5 p.m. at 6501 Fallbrook Ave., West Hills. Call (818) 704-6633. Temple City Toastmasters meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of each month at Mandarin Shanghai Restaurant 2, 558 Las Tunas Drive, Arcadia. Call Benson Au at (626) 443-3433. Pre-Paid Legal Services will meet at 7:15 p.m. at the Renaissance Hotel, 30100 Agoura Road, Agoura Hills. Call (818) 781-1111. The Winnetka Chamber of Commerce meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Monday of each month at Canoga Park Bowl, Canoga Park. Call (818) 348-6908. TUESDAY The YMCA’s Coed Service Club meets at 6 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays of each month at various restaurants. For more information, call (818) 841-0387. California Entrepreneur Women meets at 6 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at Carrows Restaurant, 18355 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. Call (818) 996-4226. The Mayor’s Office of International Trade offers free International Trade Assistance the second Tuesday of each month at the Valley Economic Alliance, 5121 Van Nuys Blvd., Sherman Oaks. Call (818) 379-7000. The Business Works Networking Group meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Carol’s Restaurant, Northridge. Call (805) 497-0092. The Greater San Fernando Valley Business and Professional Women meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, call (818) 789-5414. The Kiwanis Club of Tarzana will meet at 6:30 p.m. at Paul’s Cafe, 18588 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. Call (818) 996-1020. Business Network International, Lunch Bunch Chapter, will meet at noon at Carousel Restaurant, 150 E. Angeleno St., Burbank. Call (818) 519-1717, Ext. 220. The Professional Business Network of the San Fernando Valley will meet at 7:15 a.m. at IHOP, 19100 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. For more information, call (818) 345-4924 or log on to www.leads4business.com. The Network Advantage of Santa Clarita will meet at 7:15 a.m. at Mimi’s Cafe, Magic Mountain Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 702-9687. The Harbor chapter of Business Network International will meet at 7 a.m. at Mimi’s Cafe in Ventura. For more information, call (805) 647-3600. The Optimist Club in Action meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Big Jim’s Restaurant, 8950 Laurel Canyon Blvd., Sun Valley. Call (818) 785-2877. The International Association of Administrative Professionals, Satellite Chapter, meets at 6 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Boeing Canoga Park facility. Call (818) 586-0308. BizNet Online magazine will host a networking breakfast from 8 to 9:30 at Denny’s Restaurant, 9001 Tampa Blvd., Northridge. Call (818) 892-7883, Ext. 6, or visit the Web site at www.biznetonline.com. Burbank Business Network International will meet at 7 a.m. at the Carousel Restaurant Holiday Inn, 105 E. Angeleno Ave., Burbank. Call Harvey Branman at (818) 954-9294. The Business Referral Group of Tarzana will meet from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. at the International House of Pancakes, 19100 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. Call (818) 881-4900. The Computer Users Group meets at 7 p.m. every Tuesday at Granada Pavilion, 11128 Balboa Blvd., Granada Hills. Call Mariam Radcliffe at (818) 249-1629 or visit the Web site at www.tugnet.org. Empowerment Systems workshop: “Helping Achievers Succeed.” Call Steve Chichester at (661) 287-4753. Crescenta Valley Chapter of Ali Lassen’s Leads Club will meet at 7:15 a.m. at the Decadence Espresso Bar, 3820 Ocean View Blvd., Montrose. Call (800) 767-7337. LeTip of Calabasas will meet at 7 a.m. at Marmalade Cafe, 4783 Commons Way, Calabasas. Call Glenn Neely at (800) 617-5626, Ext. 210. LeTip of Santa Clarita will meet at 7:15 a.m. at the International House of Pancakes, 24737 W. Pico Canyon Road, Stevenson Ranch. Call Dr. John at (661) 222-9021. Motivated Toastmasters will meet from 6:50 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 5525 Sepulveda Blvd., Sherman Oaks. Call (310) 979-5777. North Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce Senior Services Networking Cluster will meet at noon at Carrows Restaurant, Devonshire St., Chatsworth. Pre-Paid Legal Services will meet Tuesdays at 7 p.m. at the Glendale Hilton Hotel, 100 Glenoaks Blvd., Glendale. Call (818) 781-1111. Open House Toastmasters meets at 6:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays of each month at Pinocchio’s restaurant, 3103 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank. Call Jackie Prince at (818) 845-4331 or e-mail jacqueline@prodigy.net. Power Partners of Santa Clarita will meet at 7 a.m. at Marie Callender’s, Magic Mountain Parkway and The Old Road, Valencia. Call (661) 298-5330. Premier Business Xchange will meet at 7:15 a.m. at the Woodland Hills Country Club, 21150 Dumetz Road, Woodland Hills. Call (818) 832-1463. Rising Star Toastmasters meets from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays of each month at Frank’s Restaurant, 6005 Vineland Ave., North Hollywood. (818) 982-9999. The Thousand Oaks Leads Club will meet at 7 a.m. at Mimi’s Cafe, 400 N. Moorpark Road, Thousand Oaks. Call (805) 371-0188. The Warner Center Rotary Club will meet for breakfast from 8 to 9 at Dilbeck/James R. Gary, 21747 Erwin St., Woodland Hills. Call (818) 347-2210. The Zonta Club of Conejo Valley meets the first and third Tuesdays of each month at California Lutheran University, Thousand Oaks. Call Sandra Cherry at (800) 266-2077. WEDNESDAY Business Network International of Northridge will have a breakfast meeting at 7 at Mimi’s Cafe, 19710 Nordhoff Place. Call Marty Laff at (818) 886-4670. The Leads Club of Calabasas will meet at 7:15 a.m. at Weiler’s Deli, 22323 Sherman Way, Canoga Park. Call (818) 915-2600. The Valley International Trade Association hosts a business networking breakfast seminar the third Wednesday of each month at 7:30 at 5121 Van Nuys Blvd., Sherman Oaks. Call (818) 379-7000. LeTip of Encino will meet at 7 a.m. at the Encino Glen Restaurant, 16821 Burbank Blvd., Encino. Call (818) 788-0011. LeTip West Valley will meet at 7 a.m. at the Woodland Hills Country Club, 21150 Dumetz Road, Woodland Hills. Call (818) 705-4866. The San Fernando Valley Council of Beta Sigma Phi, International Woman’s Cultural, Social and Philanthropic Organizations meets at 8 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at 16916 San Fernando Mission Blvd., Granada Hills. Call (818) 508-4705. Kiwanis International, the Burbank Noon Club, will meet at noon at the YMCA in Burbank. Call (818) 954-9294. The Rotary Club of Mid San Fernando Valley meets each Wednesday at 7:15 a.m. at Coco’s Family Restaurant, 16835 Sherman Way, Van Nuys. Call (661) 294-7030. The Thousand Oaks Kiwanis Club meets at 7:30 a.m. each Wednesday at the Plug Nickel Restaurant, 717 Lakefield Road, Westlake Village. Call (805) 371-0122. The Conejo Valley Optimist Club meets each Wednesday at noon at the Plug Nickel Restaurant, 717 Lakefield Road, Westlake Village. Call (805) 375-6975. Pre-Paid Legal Services will meet at 7 p.m. at the Marriott Courtyard Hotel, 15433 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks. Call (818) 781-1111. The Rotary Club of Van Nuys will meet at noon at the 94th Aero Squadron, 16320 Raymer St., Van Nuys. Call (818) 700-1939. Executive Toastmasters Club 412 meets from noon to 1:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Acapulco, 385 N. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. The Pacemasters Toastmasters club will meet at 11:45 a.m. at St. Jude Medical, 15900 Valley View Court, Sylmar. Call (818) 493-3203 or log on to www.pacesetter.com/toastmasters.htm. LeTip of Conejo will meet at 7 a.m. at Eric’s Restaurant, 495 N. Ventu Park Road, Thousand Oaks. Call (805) 498-0173. The Mid-Valley Chapter of Business Network International will meet at 7 a.m. at Bakers Square, 17921 Chatsworth St., Granada Hills. Call (818) 667-8967. The Northridge Leads Club will meet at 7:15 a.m. at Marie Callender’s, 19310 Business Center Drive, Northridge. Call (800) 767-7337. Business Network International, the Power Professionals Chapter, will meet from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Paradise Cafe, 4224 Vineland Ave., North Hollywood. Call Harvey Branman at (818) 954-9294. Burbank Toastmasters meets at 6:45 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at First Christian Church, 221 S. Sixth St., Burbank. Call Michael Devine at (818) 242-4458. The Business Exchange Group will meet from 7:15 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. at Marie Callender’s, 19310 Business Center Drive, Northridge. Call (818) 377-5851. The Conejo Valley Leads Club will meet at 7:15 a.m. at Mimi’s Cafe, 400 N. Moorpark Road, Thousand Oaks. Call Julie Paris at (818) 707-3770. Crescenta Valley Business Network International will meet for breakfast at 7 a.m. at the La Caada Flintridge Country Club, 5500 Godbey Drive, La Caada Flintridge. Call (818) 954-9294. The Executives Association of the San Fernando Valley will meet at 7:15 a.m. at the Warner Center Marriott. Call (818) 703-6161. Jewel City Toastmasters will meet at 7 p.m. in the Red Cross Building, 1501 S. Brand Blvd., Glendale. Call Linda Cota-Kumagai at (818) 771-7180. The Joseph P. Rinnert Toastmasters Club meets from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at India’s Tandoori Restaurant, 11819 Wilshire Blvd., No. 206, West Los Angeles. Call (213) 384-9727. The Mid-Valley Chamber of Commerce’s monthly breakfast meeting is held at 7:15 a.m. the last Wednesday of every month except December at the Airtel Plaza Hotel, 7277 Valjean Ave., Van Nuys. Call (818) 989-0300. North Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce Special Events Networking Cluster will meet at 5:30 p.m. at the chamber office, 9401 Reseda Blvd., Northridge. Pacific Coast Business Networking of Simi Valley meets at 7 a.m. each Wednesday at Denny’s, 2460 Sycamore Drive, Simi Valley. Call (805) 306-6410. The National Association of Women Business Owners meets the second Wednesday of each month at Maria’s Italian Kitchen, 16608 Ventura Blvd., Encino. Call (818) 901-7900. The San Fernando Valley (UCLA) Bruins Business Networking Group meets at 7:30 a.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at IHOP, 19100 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. Open to all UCLA alumni. Call Larry Davis at (818) 366-2470. The Rotary Club of Woodland Hills meets at noon every Wednesday at Woodland Hills County Club, 21150 Dumetz Road. Visitors welcome. Call (818) 702-0083. The Toluca Lake Leads Club will meet at 7:15 a.m. at Mo’s Restaurant, 4301 Riverside Drive, Burbank. Call Jon Molin at (818) 763-5162, Ext. 134. The Woodland Hills Leads Club will meet at 7:15 a.m. at Weiler’s Deli, 22323 Sherman Way, Canoga Park. Call Gary Rich at (818) 906-7356. THURSDAY The Agoura, Oak Park, Conejo Valley Chambers of Commerce Networking Group will meet at noon at Maria’s, 29035 Thousand Oaks Blvd. Call (818) 889-3150. The Santa Clarita Valley’s Leads Club will meet at 7 a.m. at Coco’s at The Old Road and Pico Canyon. Call (661) 291-1824. The Leads Club of Tarzana will meet at 7 a.m. at Carrows Restaurant, Tarzana. Call (818) 783-5530. The Los Angeles ORT Technical Institute will offer employment preparation seminars at 2:30 p.m. at 15130 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks. Call (800) 998-2678. The Business Breakfast Network will meet at 7:30 a.m. at the Greenhouse Cafe. For more information, call (805) 370-0035. Ike Krieger’s Success Roundtable, a sales- and marketing-related networking and coaching meeting, will meet at 4 p.m. at 7949 Woodley Ave., Van Nuys. Call (818) 997-7575. The Business Networking Group will meet at 7:15 a.m. at the Bagel Nosh, 23683 Calabasas Road, Calabasas. Call (818) 706-9486. Adventurers Toastmasters meets from 7:15 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. the first and third Thursdays of each month at Jerry’s Deli, 16650 Ventura Blvd., Encino. Call Don Evans at (818) 346-5239. The West Valley Chapter of Financial Planning Association meets at 7:30 a.m. the second Thursday of each month at Encino Glen, 16821 Burbank Blvd., Encino. Call (818) 344-0288. The Businesswomen Learning Golf & Networking meets at 9 a.m. every Thursday at Studio City Golf Course. Call (310) 990-0179. The Glendale Civic Center Toastmasters meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at “The Way to Happiness” Building, 201 E. Broadway, Glendale. Call (818) 352-4851. The Newbury Park Rotary Club will meet at 7:30 a.m. at the Plug Nickel Restaurant, 717 Lakefield Road, Westlake Village. Call (805) 498-2357. The National Association of Women Business Owners meets at 6 p.m. the third Thursday of each month at the Hyatt Westlake Plaza, 880 S. Westlake Blvd., Westlake Village. Call (805) 445-7121. North Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce Networking Cluster will meet at noon at Carrows Restaurant, 18505 Devonshire St., Northridge. LA Business Link will meet at 8:15 a.m. at Mimi’s Cafe in Northridge. Call (818) 701-7789. The Valley Influence Professionals will meet at 7:30 a.m. at Coco’s, 22200 Sherman Way, Canoga Park. Call (818) 710-8820. The Business Network International, Encino Chapter, will meet at 7 a.m. at the Radisson Hotel, 15433 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks. Call (818) 954-9294. The Gold Coast Chapter of Business Network International will meet at 7 a.m. at River Ridge Golf Club in Oxnard. For more information, call (805) 485-5331. Burnt Toastmasters meets at 7 a.m. Thursdays at the Braemar Country Club, 4001 Reseda Blvd., Tarzana. Call (323) 653-0500, Ext. 102. The Valley Computer Club meets at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at 521 E. Olive St., Burbank. Call (818) 846-4012. Referrals Unlimited Networking Group will meet at 7 a.m. at Mimi’s Cafe, 400 N. Moorpark Road, Thousand Oaks. Call (805) 492-9923. Business Referral Network Inc., Northridge Chapter, will meet from 7:15 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. at Mimi’s Cafe, 19710 Nordhoff Place, Chatsworth. Call Larry Davis at (818) 366-2470. Conejo Business Boomers will meet for breakfast from 7:15 to 8:30 at Mimi’s Cafe, 400 N. Moorpark Road, Thousand Oaks. Call Steve Freeman at (805) 495-4211. Cosmopolitan Toastmasters will meet at 7 p.m. at the International House of Pancakes Restaurant, 6429 Van Nuys Blvd., Van Nuys. Call Brett Yollis at (818) 705-6913. Distinguished Singles Toastmasters meets at 7:15 p.m. the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at IHOP, 19100 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. Empowerment Systems Network. Call Steve Chichester at (661) 287-4753. Inside Track will meet for breakfast from 7:15 to 8:30 at Coco’s, 21844 Victory Blvd., Woodland Hills. Call Sue Silver at (818) 591-3131. The Kiwanis Club of Northridge will meet at noon at the CSUN University Club, Dearborn Street and Zelzah Avenue, in Northridge. Call (818) 377-4566. The Kiwanis Club of Van Nuys will meet at noon at the Airtel Plaza Hotel, 7277 Valjean Ave., Van Nuys. Call Robert Sentenac at (818) 988-2671. LeTip of Northridge will meet at 7 a.m. at the Porter Valley Ranch Country Club. Call Manny Solana at (877) 444-4503. The Lunch Bunch of the Westlake Village Chamber of Commerce holds business networking luncheons the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at Marie Callender’s, 3635 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Westlake Village. Call (818) 991-3101. Studio City Business Network International meets from 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. every Thursday at the Beverly Garland Holiday Inn, Paradise Cafe, 4224 Vineland Ave., North Hollywood. Call Dr. Pohl at (323) 436-0303. Toastmasters International Salesmastery Club No. 6178 will meet from 6:45 to 9 p.m. in the Community Room, Sherman Oaks Galleria. For information, call (818) 908-9915. Westlake Agoura Thousand Oaks LeTip business networking group meets at 7:01 a.m. every Thursday at The Plug Nickel Restaurant, 717-I Lakefield Road, Westlake Village. Call Mark A. Lester at (805) 341-7668 for reservation. Warner Center Toastmasters meets from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at the Marriott Hotel in Woodland Hills. Call Carolyn at (818) 996-7483. FRIDAY !hair The Sunrise Rotary Club of Westlake Village meets at 7:30 a.m. each Friday at the Plug Nickel Restaurant, 717 Lakefield Road, Westlake Village. Call (805) 494-9033. The Sherman Oaks LeTip chapter meets at 7 a.m. each Friday at Marie Callender’s, 14743 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks. Call (818) 906-0080. The Kiwanis Club of Glendale will meet at noon at the Glendale Elks Lodge, 120 E. Colorado Blvd., Glendale. Call (818) 248-7796. The Valley Success Builders Networking Group will meet at 7 a.m. at Food Sensations, 19535 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. Call (818) 407-9200. North Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce Home Improvement Breakfast Networking Cluster will meet at 7 at Marie Callender’s, 19310 Business Center Drive, Northridge. North Valley Business International meets at 7 a.m. every Friday at Abe’s Deli, 19626 Nordhoff St., Northridge. Call Mark Smith at (818) 709-2019. WINGS, a business networking group, meets at 7:15 a.m. every other Friday at Weiler’s Deli, 22325 Sherman Way, Canoga Park. Call Paula Jurgenson at (818) 341-5401. SATURDAY Glendale Loquations Toastmasters meets at 9:30 a.m. the first and third Saturdays of each month at Descanso Gardens, 1418 Descanso Drive, La Caada Flintridge. Call (323) 550-1997. – Compiled by Kim Armendariz Note: Some events may require reservations or fees. The Daily News welcomes items for Business Agenda. All items should be received at least two weeks before event. Send to Business Agenda, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! MEETINGS WEDNESDAY The Thousand Oaks-Westlake Village Regional Chamber of Commerce will host an Oktoberfest Mixer at 5:30 p.m. at 101 N. Westlake Blvd., Westlake Village. CONTINUING EVENTS TODAY last_img read more

Clayberg Selected As Nominee for Allstate AFCA Goodworks Team

first_imgNORTHBROOK, Ill. – Drake University fifth-year senior defensive lineman Nathan Clayberg has been selected as one of 169 student-athletes nationwide eligible for the 2018 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team®. After the final team members are announced in September, college football fans can visit the Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® official page on ESPN.com to view profiles and images of the players and honorary head coach, and vote for the 2018 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® Captain. Fans are also encouraged to follow along and join in on the conversation by searching and using #GoodWorksTeam on their social media channels throughout the season. Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS)Arizona State University – Manny Wilkins Auburn University – Derrick Brown Boston College – Michael Walker Brigham Young University – Tanner Mangum  Clemson University – Sean Pollard  Colorado State University – Adam Prentice  Duke University – Johnathan Lloyd  East Carolina University – Alex Turner Eastern Michigan University – Jeremy Hickey  Florida State University – Fredrick Jones  Indiana University – Ricky Brookins  Iowa State University – D’Andre Payne  Kansas State University – Dalton Risner  Kent State University – Matt Bahr  Louisiana State University – Blake Ferguson  Marshall University – Chase Hancock  Miami University – James Gardner  Michigan State University – Khari Willis  Middle Tennessee State University – Matt Bonadies  Mississippi State University – Nick Fitzgerald  Northern Illinois University – Max Scharping  Old Dominion University – Oshane Ximines  Penn State University – Nick Scott  Purdue University – David Blough  Rutgers University – Zack Heeman  Southern Methodist University – Jordan Wyatt  Syracuse University – Kielan Whitner  TCU – Ben Banogu  Texas A&M University – Erik McCoy  Texas State University – A.J. Krawczyk  Tulane University – Brian Newman  UCF – Jordan Johnson  UNC-Charlotte – Juwan Foggie United States Air Force Academy – Brody Bagnall University of Akron – Brian Reinke  University of Alabama – Jamey Mosley University of Arkansas – Hjalte Froholdt University of California, Berkeley – Patrick Laird  University of Cincinnati – Garrett Campbell University of Florida – Fred Johnson  University of Georgia – Rodrigo Blankenship  University of Hawaii – Dakota Torres  University of Illinois – Nick Allegretti  University of Iowa – Parker Hesse  University of Kansas – Joe Dineen  University of Kentucky – C.J. Conrad  University of Louisville – Dae Williams  University of Michigan – Chase Winovich  University of Minnesota – Emmit Carpenter  University of Missouri – Corey Fatony University of Nebraska – Freedom Akinmoladun  University of Nevada – Ty Gangi   University of Notre Dame – Nic Weishar  University of Oklahoma – Caleb Kelly  University of Pittsburgh – Darrin Hall University of South Alabama – Sean Grayer  University of Southern California – Jordan Austin  University of Southern Mississippi – Picasso Nelson Jr. University of Tennessee – Kyle Phillips  University of Texas – Chase Moore  University of Texas at San Antonio – Jalen Rhodes  University of Toledo – Cody Thompson  University of Tulsa – Willie Wright University of Utah – Chase Hansen  University of Virginia – Lester Coleman  University of Wisconsin – D’Cota Dixon  Utah State University – Jacoby Wildman  Vanderbilt University – Khari Blasingam  West Virginia University – Will Grier  Western Michigan University – Jamauri Bogan The SEC leads all conferences with 71 selections to the Good Works Team since it began in 1992. The SEC is followed by the Atlantic Coast Conference with 37 selections and the Big 12 Conference with 30 selections. Georgia is in first place with 18 honorees to the Allstate AFCA Good Works Team. ® The Bulldogs are followed by Kentucky and Nebraska with 14 honorees. Super Bowl XLII, XLVI and XLI champion quarterbacks Eli and Peyton Manning were members of the 2002 and 1997 Good Works Teams®, respectively. Combined Divisions (FCS, II, III & NAIA)Alabama State University – Carl Thompson Alma College – Hunter Hoffman  Angelo State University – Connor Flanigan  Arkansas Tech University – Tremel Glasper Ashland University – Travis Downing  Aurora University – Kurtis Chione  Bemidji State University – Jared Henning  Berry College – Justen Booket  Bethel University (Minn.) – Kyle Kilgore  Black Hills State University – Zane Lindsey  Butler University – Drew Bevelhimer  Capital University – Cory Heeter  Carthage College – Jeremy Behnke  Chapman University – Elias Deeb  Colorado State University-Pueblo – Quinn Vandekoppel  Concord University – Brandon Plyler  Concordia University, Nebraska – Vince Beasley  Dakota State University – Brandon Schmit  DePauw University – Hunter Sego  Drake University – Nathan Clayberg  East Stroudsburg University – Levi Murphy Eastern Kentucky University – LJ Scott  Eastern New Mexico University – Wyatt Strand  Eastern Washington University – Sam McPherson Ferris State University – Travis Russell Franklin and Marshall College – Tanner Erisman  Frostburg State University – Riley Hartman Furman University – Avery Armstrong  Guilford College – Jeremiah Hedrick  Harvard University – Jake McIntyre Hope College – Mason Dekker Howard University – John Petricca  Illinois State University – Jake Kolbe Jacksonville University – Jake Dempsey  James Madison University – Grant Westbrook  Johns Hopkins University – Luke McFadden  Kennesaw State University – Nicolas Snowden  Lewis & Clark College – Pete Lahti Lindenwood University – Jonathan Harris  Macalester College – Ethan Levin Manchester University – Brady Nyland  Marist College – Kyle Hamrick  Mercer University – Isaiah Buehler Millikin University – Matthew Brown  Millsaps College – Andrew Cassidy Minot State University – Parker Franzen  Monmouth University – Ryan Wetzel  Montana State University – Wilson Brott Montana Tech – Clay Dean Moravian College – Nick Zambelli  Morgan State University – Deontaye White Morningside College – Trent Solsma  North Carolina Central University – Nick Leverett  North Dakota State University – Easton Stick Northern State University – Zach Mohs  Ohio Dominican University – Cory Contini  Ohio Wesleyan University – Cameron Smith  Peru State College – Daniel Boshart Princeton University – Kurt Holuba  Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute – Sean Egan  Rowan University – Kevin Stokes Saint Augustine’s University – Zack Jenkins Saint John’s University (Minn.) – Jackson Erdmann  Samford University – Kevin Marion  South Dakota School of Mines – Jake Sullivan  South Dakota State University – Taryn Christion  Southeastern Oklahoma State University – Joel Carlos  Southwest Minnesota State University – Jon Dicke Springfield College – Andrew Papirio  Stephen F. Austin State University – Cody Williams  Stevenson University – Dan Williams  Stony Brook University – Marc Nolan  Texas A&M University-Commerce – Chris Smith Texas A&M University-Kingsville – Sean Landez  The College of Wooster – Hunter Coia  University of California, Davis – Kooper Richardson  University of Central Missouri – Austin Miller  University of Dubuque – Collin Stefanowski  University of Minnesota-Crookston – Will Cross  University of Minnesota-Duluth – Trapper Ward University of Mount Union – Jared Ruth  University of North Dakota – Brady Oliveira  University of Pennsylvania – Sam Philippi  University of Puget Sound – Dwight Jackson  University of Sioux Falls – Logan Dykstra  University of St. Thomas – Jacques Perra  University of Tennessee at Chattanooga – Alex Trotter  University of Wisconsin-Platteville – Mark Johnson  University of Wisconsin-Whitewater – Elliot Kim  Upper Iowa University – Tanner Thompson  Utica College – Malcolm Stowe Virginia State University – Shakym Peters  Walsh University – Morgan Trust  Wartburg College – Matt Sacia  Washington University in St. Louis – Jason Singer  Wayne State University – Deiontae Nicholas  Westminster College (Pa.) – Bryson Paulinellie  Wingate University – Adam Riley  Youngstown State University – Tevin McCaster About the Allstate AFCA Good Works Team®The Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® was established in 1992 by the College Football Association, recognizing the extra efforts made by college football players and student support staff off the field.  AFCA became the governing body of the award in 1997 and continues to honor college football players who go the extra mile for those in need.  Allstate worked to present the award starting with the 2008 season. The following players have been nominated for consideration to be named to the 2018 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team®: The Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® has been one of the most esteemed honors in college football for more than 25 years. The student-athletes who are nominated for this award not only demonstrate a unique dedication to community service and desire to make a positive impact on the lives around them, but they also show tremendous perseverance as well as the ability to overcome personal struggles and come out victorious against all odds.  center_img Clayberg, a finance and accounting major, has graciously given his time to a wide range of community service projects thought his Bulldog career. He has founded Unite, which is a group that focuses on raising up and empowering young leaders to have dreams to do big things; as well as Next Step Moving Company, which is a for-profit moving company that exists to funnel money to non-profit organizations. Clayberg has also served the Blank’s Children Hospital, Special Olympics, Night of Starts and the Drake Football Reading Program. Clayberg is one of four Pioneer League student-athletes on the list, joining, Drew Bevelhimer (Butler), Jake Dempsey (Jacksonville) and Kyle Hamrick (Marist). Clayberg is a two-time All-PFL selection and CoSIDA Academic All-District honoree. He was also named First Team CoSIDA Academica All-America last year. On the field, he recorded 44 tackles with five tackles for a loss and 2.5 sacks last season.  Print Friendly Version About AFCAThe AFCA was founded in 1922 and currently has more than 11,000 members around the world ranging from the high school level to the professional ranks. According to its constitution, the AFCA was formed, in part, to “maintain the highest possible standards in football and in the coaching profession” and to “provide a forum for the discussion and study of all matters pertaining to football.”last_img read more

Ohio Beef Expo gearing up to celebrate 30th anniversary

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Beef Expo, the premier event of Ohio’s beef industry, will take place March 17-19 at the Ohio Expo Center in Columbus, Ohio. This annual event, coordinated by the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA), includes a kickoff social, breed sales, shows and displays, an educational seminar, three-day trade show and a highly competitive junior show.New and exciting things to note for the 30th Ohio Beef Expo include a three-day trade show for vendors. This provides the opportunity for Expo-goers to make a day trip to Columbus and experience all aspects of the event. The youth day events, including the judging contest and Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) sessions, will move to a new day and be held on Friday, March 17.OCA members and Expo exhibitors are invited to attend The Social, sponsored by Merial, on Thursday evening, March 16, at the Expo headquarters hotel, Crowne Plaza North. The kickoff event will auction items for OCA’s PAC fund such as a one-of-a-kind copper kettle donated by the Crawford County Cattlemen’s Association. Other items to sell in a live auction at The Social are the original painting commemorating the 30th Ohio Beef Expo Anniversary by C.J. Brown. Proceeds from the original painting will go toward a scholarship fund to be awarded to applicants through the Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation. 30th Ohio Beef Expo prints will be available for Expo attendees to purchase in C.J. Brown Studio’s booth in the trade show, as well as the OCA membership booth. Proceeds from each print sold will also benefit the scholarship fund.Friday, March 17 will mark the official start of the Expo with registration for the judging contest now taking place in the Voinovich building’s upper mezzanine. Contest participants will meet at 8:00 a.m. for registration. The breed shows and parades will begin at 8:30 a.m. in the Evans Cattle Company Arena (Cooper) and O’Neill buildings. At 10:00 a.m. cattlemen can attend an educational seminar “Top 6 Ways to be Successful and Profitable with Cattle in Ohio”. All cattlemen are invited to attend the session sponsored by United Producers, Inc. At noon youth are invited to attend a fitting demonstration in the Voinovich building. The online feeder cattle sale will be held on Friday at 1:30 p.m. As the sale takes place, judging contest awards will be presented at 2:30 p.m. and then youth can attend a BQA session at 3:30 p.m. before heading to the junior show welcome party at 5:30 p.m. and hearing from representatives with Weaver Leather Livestock for a cattle care demonstration. Expo attendees can also visit the trade show with over 125 vendors from 18 states that offer products and services beneficial to all cattlemen.Saturday, March 18 will host the breed cattle sales in the Voinovich building, starting at 10:00 a.m. Prior to the first lot selling, “A Tribute to 30 years of the Ohio Beef Expo” will take place in Sale Ring 2 with Angus, Hereford, Maine-Anjou, Shorthorn and Simmental cattle selling afterward. Breed sale catalogs will be posted online at www.ohiobeefexpo.com as they become available. The junior showmanship competition will begin at noon on Saturday with over 400 participants competing for top honors in their respective divisions.On Sunday, March 19 junior exhibitors will begin showing at 8:00 a.m. in the Evans Cattle Company Arena (Cooper). New this year, OCA will be offering 10 – $50 coupons to be used on Sunday only with any vendor in the trade show. Coupons will be awarded to individuals that share an OCA Facebook post promoting the 3-day trade show set to launch on March 1.Download the Ohio Beef Expo app. Available for both iPhones and Androids, the Ohio Beef Expo app provides a complete list of trade show exhibitors, breed shows, seedstock sales, junior shows and educational events. The app also allows users to search for activities, view schedules, download sale catalogs and receive exclusive mobile alerts.More than 30,000 visitors from 25 states and Canada routinely attend the Ohio Beef Expo. It is ranked as one of the top five largest events in central Ohio and is the premier location to meet Ohio’s cattle producers. Don’t miss it! Visit www.ohiobeefexpo.com for more information.last_img read more

Fatal and Non-Fatal Child Maltreatment

first_imgBy Caitlin Hunter and Heidi RadunovichCreative Commons Licensing [Flickr, Punishment, October 14, 2008] retrieved on September 8, 2015Children living in homes where there was recently a major life event are thought to be more at risk for being victims of fatal child maltreatment. What exactly are the factors which contribute to fatal child maltreatment, and what can be done to stop it from happening?The purpose of the study by Douglas and Mohn (2014) was to examine the differences between cases of fatal and non-fatal child maltreatment on a national scale [1]. The focus was specifically on victim/family characteristics of fatal maltreatment and how those differed from non-fatal maltreatment victims. The researchers were also interested in the social services victims received prior to death, and how those services were different than victims of non-fatal maltreatment. This study found that younger children were more likely to suffer fatal child maltreatment rather than non-fatal, and that the likelihood of fatal maltreatment was higher for males than females, and for those children who identified as African American. Children who had been victims of child maltreatment in the past, or who were in homes where there was other domestic violence, were actually less likely to be victims of fatal child maltreatment.  Children who were emotionally disturbed, had a learning disability, or had behavior problems were also less likely to suffer a fatality. These findings are interesting because they are inconsistent with prior research on the subject.Fatality victims were more likely to have a younger perpetrator, and were also more likely to live in a household where housing is a problem, or in which there were financial difficulties. It was less likely for fatality victims to have received social services in the past. These services include: family support, foster care, court-appointed representatives, and case management. The author of this study stressed the importance of this last finding, stating that the use of services could be a very important protective factor against fatal child maltreatment incidents. Ensuring the use of services are not only useful in their own ways, but they also keep the child visible in the community, lessening the risk that maltreatment will go unnoticed.  References[1] Douglas, E. M., & Mohn, B. L. (2014). Fatal and non-fatal child maltreatment in the US: An analysis of child, caregiver, and service utilization with the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data Set. Child Abuse & Neglect, 38(1), 42-51. doi:10.1016/j.chiabu.2013.10.022This post was written by Caitlin Hunter  & Heidi Radunovich, PhD, members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more