Keep illegal immigrants, drug criminals in jail

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionSo our compassionate caring fearless leader of New York pardons illegal immigrants who are in prison. This is our governor who was sworn to protect and uphold the laws of our state and nation.He gives these pardons to show President Trump that comrade Cuomo will not be pushed around and told he should enforce the laws of his state and nation. I found the little side note that the reporter stated this one particular illegal immigrant was arrested for selling a small amount of cocaine to an undercover police officer. So other than being in this country illegally and selling a controlled substance, he seems to a great guy. Raise your hand if you want him living next to you and your family. Any takers? I am guessing no.This is a slap in the face of the officers who risk their lives to get drug dealers off the street and put them in prison for dealing drugs. I think instead of pushing back, we let the liberal socialist followers keep doing what they are doing. During the next election, a simple question can be asked:Do you want a governor who puts illegal immigrants on the street so they can deal drugs to your kids, or are you going to vote for the person who says I think we should keep illegal immigrants who deal drugs on our streets in jail until they are deported? Which one will you vote for?Robert SponableSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcyEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%Schenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, musicMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashlast_img read more

Protest Sinclair’s influence on WRGB

first_imgSeeing the recent video of Liz Bishop from WRGB Channel 6 News simultaneously spouting the same words as 55 other “newscasters” from different stations across the country stunned me. Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion That’s not how an independent news source should behave, and that’s because WRGB’s journalists aren’t independent. In fact, WRGB is owned by Sinclair Broadcast Group, a private Maryland-based company that owns over 190 television stations in the United States.When anchors Liz Bishop or Greg Floyd read the news, there’s no way to know if they wrote what they’re saying or if Sinclair scripted it for them.In addition to mandating what “newscasters” say on-air, Sinclair also mandates “must run” segments. So instead of allowing WRGB to focus its broadcast on local stories by local reporters, Sinclair restricts local input by requiring WRGB and other stations to air Sinclair-produced national segments, including the “Terrorism Alert Desk,” commentaries by Republican political analyst Boris Epshteyn, and pre-produced segments by Sinclair-owned Circa.Unless viewers and advertisers stand up and demand journalistic independence and integrity, Sinclair’s practices won’t change.I no longer watch WRGB Channel 6 News, and I plan to join others in protesting for journalistic integrity outside WRGB on April 26.JUDY BECK Saratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Schenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

Guest Column: Community supports families of Schoharie limo crash victims, thanks first responders

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionLast month, dozens of first responders and their families gathered for an evening of food, drink and dancing at Settles Hill Banquets in Altamont.The first responders were among the agencies that came upon the horrific scene of the deadly limousine crash in Schoharie on Oct. 6, 2018, that killed 20. After a year of vigils, funerals and memorials, this night was an opportunity to honor the first responders for their heroic efforts.It was also the final piece of a yearlong effort, Healing Schoharie, a grassroots benefit for the families of the victims and the first responders.As the lead organizer, I am proud of the work our group did to raise more than $50,000.As the father of seven (five girls and two boys), I felt compelled to act. Eight others from the community joined me.  As a native of New Jersey, I’ve got Bruce Springsteen in my DNA.I reached out to Chris Phillips, the editor of Backstreets, the main online source for Springsteen news.The Boss soon signed for auction a framed promotional poster from the Mohawk Harbor event: “God Bless, Bruce Springsteen.A Schenectady woman placed the winning bid of $1,525.“I just wanted to help,” she told me.We recently distributed the bulk of the funds to the families of the victims. We decided that the best way to honor the 150 first responders would be to host an appreciation dinner. From the beginning, our committee was guided by the mantra that when a tragedy strikes, a community pulls together. David Buicko of the Galesi Group offered Mohawk Harbor as our venue.Philip Morris of Proctors allowed us to sell tickets through the theater’s website.Companies including MVP Healthcare, Beekman 1802, and Rivers Casino and Resort soon signed on.On Oct. 28, more than 1,000 people turned out for “Healing Schoharie,” featuring music, food vendors and raffles.Despite a cold and steady rain, the event raised nearly $46,000.This included more than $14,000 from Druthers Brewing Co. at Mohawk Harbor, its proceeds from beer sales and 50 percent of all customer checks for meals and drinks served in the restaurant that day. Any remaining funds would support the permanent memorial at the crash site.The event at Settles Hill featured local singer Demantra Constantine, who opened with a moving rendition of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah.”I struggled to read a note to the first responders from Jill Richardson-Perez on behalf of the victims’ families.Her son, Matthew Coons, 27, was among those killed. “We cannot imagine what you saw or experienced – we do not want to even imagine it – but you may have lost something that day as well as we have,” she wrote. “You are to be honored … you are heroes and you must remember this.”For more than three hours, the first responders enjoyed a hearty buffet and music by Grand Central Station.center_img Ten minutes before the event was to end, a first responder asked if we could pass around a hat around to extend the night. Few wanted to leave.The dancing continued for another 30 minutes or so.“Thanks for an amazing evening,” one fire chief remarked as the night wound down.“We needed this.”Phillip Wajda is director of media relations at Union College.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists It would have been easy to consider our event a success and move on.However, with so many victims and first responders, the money we raised (minus expenses) would not go far.In December, Centre Street in Schenectady hosted an event featuring Grand Central Station.For a $10 donation, patrons could request a song for the band to play.Instead, patrons dropped $20, $40, $50 – and in one case, $100 – to support the cause.A month later, the First Reformed Church of Schenectady and the Stockade Inn hosted Bend and Brew, featuring yoga and craft beer donated by Mad Jack Brewing Company.We were inching closer to the unstated goal of $50,000.last_img read more

Internet returns may hit turnover rents

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Didcot powers up for £30m regeneration plan

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Croydon offices: Croydon’s in-crowd

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Stay of execution for Rotunda

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Waiting for recovery

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Fitzhardinge shares peak on 2003 results

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Alibaba revenue up 38 percent in third fiscal quarter

first_imgChina’s e-commerce giant Alibaba Group reported year-on-year revenue growth of 38 percent to 161.4 billion yuan (US$23.12 billion) for the fiscal quarter ending Dec. 30, 2019.The company’s net profit attributable to shareholders was 52.31 billion yuan, soaring 58.3 percent compared with the same period last year. The profit surge was mainly due to the strong performances in online retailing and cloud computing, the company said.In the third fiscal quarter, the Alibaba Group Holding was listed on the Hong Kong stock exchange, making it the first Chinese Internet enterprise to list both in New York and Hong Kong. Alibaba’s annual active consumers on Chinese retail marketplaces reached 711 million. Mobile monthly active users on Chinese retail marketplaces reached 824 million in December, an increase of 39 million than that at the end of September 2019, with 60 percent of the annual new consumers coming from less developed regions. “We will remain dedicated to investing in digital infrastructure and services, supporting our customers and partners across the Alibaba Digital Economy, especially during the challenging time,” said Maggie Wu, the chief financial officer of Alibaba Group.Daniel Zhang, chairman and chief executive officer of Alibaba Group said Alibaba will also mobilize its strength in commerce and technology to support the fight against novel coronavirus and mitigate the impact of the outbreak on small and medium-sized enterprises by lowering their costs.Topics :last_img read more